Hi Pam!

You may remember me from tweeting SO excessively at you (@xxxxx… guilty!) during the WVU IMC Integrate 2014 conference just last month.

I first wanted to thank you for your incredible session; it was clearly one that was most memorable to me, as I have been showing all of my Brazilian family the incredible examples you showed us (the blood drive campaign, and the beer turnstile). Your session inspired me.

For my class, and my final paper, they asked us to write a paper on a topic that we learned about at Integrate. It was a no-brainer that I had to do my paper on your session and your topic of expertise.

I was hoping you could answer me a few questions:

1) What is the importance of studying these global marketing campaigns for use in our own work here in the United States?

2) In your opinion, what has been the best and most effective marketing campaign that you’ve seen come from a different country/culture than ours?

3) What is the biggest difference that you see, in terms of marketing, in the way that other countries handle campaigns in contrast to the United States?

4) With the Tesco example in South Korea, could you ever see something like that working in the United States? What brand do you think would execute this the best, and why?

Thank you SO MUCH for your help! I have written the rest of my paper to submit tonight, but your answers would be so greatly appreciated.

Kind regards-
Mel

Deal Mel-

It is great to hear from you.  Thank you for tweeting excessively during my session. 😀

Regarding your questions, here are some of my thoughts:

1) What is the importance of studying these global marketing campaigns for use in our own work here in the United States?
The United States is a multi-cultural and multi-racial nation. Even if the target market is only the U.S., there are multiple regions and cultures that we still need to take into account. Innovation and inspiration come from connecting dots that seem unrelated. Understanding what other countries are doing will give us new perspectives and help us connect seemingly irrelevant dots.  It’s not about copying, plagiarizing or imitating blindly. It’s about taking others’ ideas, internalizing them, transforming them by applying our own voice, style, and point of view and making it into something new.  That’s how we learn, improvise and create.

2) In your opinion, what has been the best and most effective marketing campaign that you’ve seen come from a different country/culture than ours?
I have seen awesome campaigns and ads from all countries and cultures.  This anti-smoking campaign from Thailand is incredibly powerful and effective:

http://www.upworthy.com/some-people-call-it-the-best-anti-smoking-ad-ever-after-watching-i-might-be-one-of-them

This Bangkok Insurance ad is hilariously funny:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3ZNIAP53Vng

They are taking some seemingly simple creative ideas and transforming them into something to which we can all relate.

3) What is the biggest difference that you see, in terms of marketing, in the way that other countries handle campaigns in contrast to the United States?
They tend to be agile and nimble.  Of course, local brands don’t usually have big budgets. Limited budgets and resources tend to require more creativity.

4) With the Tesco example in South Korea, could you ever see something like that working in the United States?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fGaVFRzTTP4

Tesco’s example works so well, because it serves Korean’s commuters’ needs. While they wait for their trains on subway platforms, they can finish shopping at the same time. By the way, their subway platforms are clean and the shopping experience is pleasant.  I am not sure that the exact same technology implemented in every NYC subway station will provide a similar shopping experience. Copying the technology may not work well everywhere there is a transit center.  However, intelligent application of the concept may work in specific targeted locations.

Companies need to think about what makes sense for their customers and how to make their shopping experience better. We can use technology to build seamless shopping experiences for our customers. It sounds simple, but it requires a lot of hard work behind the scenes to make user-friendly and intuitive technology.

Mel, I hope you find these responses helpful for your paper.

Cheers-
Pam

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Author

Pam Didner

Posted on

July 28, 2014

Category
Content Marketing, Global Marketing Blog, Marketing Know-Hows, Marketing Optimization