Global Content Marketing Workshop in Portland

My New Year Resolution: Global Content Marketing Workshop in Portland

One of my New Year resolutions for 2016 is to try something new or pick one thing and do it differently every month. For January, I will offer my own ‘Global Content Marketing’ workshop in Portland. This workshop focuses on how to establish a global content marketing collaboration process for you and your local teams. Compared with the past workshops I did at marketing conferences, this one will be longer, more in-depth and allow enough time to complete all exercises from planning to measurement. In addition, I am responsible for almost all aspects of this workshop, especially promotions.

The idea of doing a local workshop stems from my chat with Tom Biven, Managing Director of 52 Limited, a creative talent recruiting agency in town. They regularly host creative and marketing sessions for local marketing professionals in their beautiful historical landmark 3-story building. Tom suggested that I can use their facility to offer the workshop in town. So no traveling for me. Yay!

After some discussion, I decided to offer one 50-minute Content Marketing Overview session and one 3-hour Global Content Marketing workshop back-to-back on 1/27. Marketers have options to register for a short session or/and a workshop.

Content Marketing Overview

 

Course description:

What is content marketing, anyway? What are creative ways to leverage content as a means of building your brands and helping your customers? I will share techniques and case studies.

After the 50-minute session, you will:

  • Clearly define content marketing and its benefits
  • Understand the 4 P’s of content marketing
  • Identify 1-2 key actions to apply to your job

Cost: $25
Time: 40 min. + 15 min Q&A
Date: January 27th, 2016
Location: 52 Limited
Register for Content Marketing Overview: 
http://bit.ly/contenteasy

 

Workshop: 7 step guide to effectively scale your content across regions

 

Course Description:

After the ‘Content Marketing Overview’, I will do a deep dive workshop on how to implement cross-region content marketing initiatives for your company or your clients. I will talk about the balance of global vs. local from a content marketing perspective. I will also discuss the best practices for collaborating between headquarters and local teams to effectively implement your marketing strategy.

After the 3-hour Workshop, You Will:

  • Think about Global Content Marketing differently
  • Comprehend a process that you can implement internally
  • Understand do’s and don’ts of scaling content across regions

Cost: $199
Time: 3 hour (+ Q&A session)
Limit: 25 people
Date: January 27th, 2016
Location: 52 Limited
Register for Global Content Marketing: 
bit.ly/1R6Zo6R

I have given sessions and workshops at various marketing conferences, but offering a session and workshop back-to-back and on my own is doing the same thing in a different way. Executing an integrated promotion plan across paid, owned and earned channels is something new. It’s wonderful to kick off January trying something new and different.

In case you are interested in content marketing and can be in Portland on 1/27, click below to register! It will be great to see you!

Register for Content Marketing Overview: http://bit.ly/contenteasy

Register for Global Content Marketing Workshop: bit.ly/1R6Zo6R

Happy New Year!

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Marketing Tools You Should Know

Content Marketing Tools

 

Seems like every day there is a fresh new set of marketing tools to help you do your job better. It can be time-consuming (and even a little intimidating) making sure you are using the right ones for your audience. So, instead of wasting precious time on a bunch of tools you have no use for, try pinpointing exactly what would help you manage your content marketing efforts better. Then just Google “how to…” or “tools to…”. You might surprise yourself and find exactly what you were looking for.

To help get you started, below are some articles that share helpful content marketing tools to boost your engagement with your audience and drive B2B engagement.

4 Quick Tools to Help an Audience Share Your Content

marketing tools you should know

By Markelle Harden published May 10, 2015 As social channels gain traction in search marketing, the need to create content that people want to share becomes crucial to an inbound campaign. A 2014 study from Social Media Examiner found that 92% of respondents identified social media as “important to business.”

Read More at Contentmarketinginstitute

marketing tools

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A User-Friendly Way to Showcase Expert Advice

I read a lot of advice-from-experts blog posts and notice that most of them require scrolling down past a bunch of adds to see all the advice. I thought the following blog post has an interesting way of showcasing expert advice.

Marco Mijatovic at FirstSiteGuide.com reached out to me and other bloggers to share our best blogging tips.  I was more than happy to comply.  Marco compiled the responses (after herding 55 blogger-cats) into a post: 55 Marketing Experts Reveal 3 Best Blogging Tips. As a good content marketer, he followed up with all the bloggers and asked us to share it with our networks. I was more than happy to do that, but not before checking out the blog post.

 

Initially…

The blog post was nicely done! They converted our photos into digitally re-imaged head-shots. A nice touch that gives the site a unique feel! The text is nicely spaced. Tips are categorized in #1, #2 and #3 for easy reading.

a user-friendly way to showcase expert advice

a user-friendly way to showcase expert advice

With 55 experts, it’s obviously a very long post and readers need to keep scrolling down. It seemed to take forever to get through all the scrolling down. I couldn’t help thinking about the movie, “Are We There Yet?” Which led me to think it might have been more effective to split this into two blog posts.

 

Two weeks later…

I received e-mail from Marco informing me that there had been some design changes to the post. They put the photo images of bloggers at the beginning of the blog post.

a user-friendly way to showcase expert advice

Hovering over an image reveals the name of the expert and clicking on it will take you directly to their tips. I like this change a lot.

a user-friendly way to showcase expert advice

a user-friendly way to showcase expert advice

I love the change. It eliminates much of the scrolling that users had to do previously to get through the article.

It’s easy to write a long blog post just for desktop format without worrying too much about design. With the rise of mobile devices and smaller form factor devices, design and UX will play a more important role in the future content marketing efforts. This is one great example of recognizing the needs of different form factors.

the user-friendly way to showcase expert advice
 
user-friendly way to showcase expert advice

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Marketing Innovation – Trends, Predictions, Case Study & More

Marketing Innovation: A Digital Media Explosion

 

Marketing innovation solves some of the most complex challenges we have ever faced as a society and a global community. Marketing innovation almost takes place daily with the explosion of channels we use to gather, consume and share information we need to stay on top of current and future trends in order to exceed client needs. Below is a collection of articles that includes tips for staying on top of innovation, a case study and how to prepare for marketing in 2020.

5 Ways To Be More Innovative In The Digital Age

Global content marketing innovation

The following guest post is by Shama Kabani, a business strategist for the digital age, and serves as founder & CEO of The Marketing Zen Group (a full service web marketing & digital PR firm). She is also the author of The Zen of Social Media Marketing (3rd edition). Tweet This!

Read More at Forbes

marketing innovation

 

Five Innovation Trends For CMOs

marketing innovation and digital media

This article is by Lisa Nirell, chief energy officer at EnergizeGrowth, a marketing consultancy; speaker; and author of The Mindful Marketer: How to Stay Present and Profitable in a Data-Driven World. The digital marketing train has left the station. Thankfully, more than 7,000 eager passengers jumped aboard the fast-moving Adobe Digital Summit last […] Tweet This!

Read More at Forbes

marketing innovation, tips, best practices

See How BuzzSumo Uses Their Product as Their Marketing Platform

digital channels examined in marketing innovations

Depending on our job descriptions, our goals and our budgets, we all use a mixture of tools to create, promote or measure content. One tool that I’ve started using is BuzzSumo. I use it to discover content that’s been heavily shared, find influencers for niche topics, receive targeted content alerts based on keywords and to check on specific sites’ content performance. Tweet This!

Read More at www.pamdidner.com

content marketing innovation

Are you ready for marketing in 2020?

innovation marketing technology and platforms

The explosion of channels we all use to gather, consume and share information is having a dramatic impact on the methods of modern marketers. We largely don’t answer cold calls, respond to unwanted emails, click on banner ads or appreciate disruptive marketing techniques. Tweet This!

Read More at The Guardian

marketing innovation tips and best practices

marketing innovation - Evaluating My E-Mail Effort

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Classic Cocktails and 5 Ways for B2B to Use Mobile Apps

5 Ways for B2B to Use Mobile Apps

 

Sean Flaherty and I met at Teardrop in Portland to catch up after the New Year. Sean’s company, ITX, offers software product development services from strategy to support to serve marketers needs (web site and mobile app planning, design, architecture, production, comprehensive support and analytics) across devices. He is not only a marketing techie, but also a cocktail geek. He introduced me to a classic cocktail, The Old Pal. What a wonderful drink with a mixture of dryness and lightness and a touch of lemon, bitter orange and quinine flavors. Cheers, Sean! (See the Sean’s special recipe below)

Half way through our conversation, he proudly showed me the mobile app ITX just developed for its customers. I asked him why they developed a mobile app for the specific purpose of presenting project status updates, when this information can easily be accessed through the existing ITX websites.

Start with a purpose

Sean had a purpose in mind when he created that mobile app. I will touch on that in the third bullet below. Sean made a point of explaining that any marketing effort need to have a clear purpose. Mobile apps are no exception. You need to understand “WHY” you create your mobile app. Clearly articulate the purpose of the mobile app and the benefits to users when they use the app. Don’t create an app unless you know what end-users need it will address. Amen to that, Sean. I emphasized a similar point in my book, Global Content Marketing. It all comes back to your purpose and your audience.

Sean continued to identify three potential reasons to create B2B mobile apps. I added content assessment and corporate communications as two additional reasons.

5 Ways for B2B to Use Mobile Apps

  • Sales Enablement
  • Employee Productivity
  • Customer Retention
  • Content Assessment
  • Corporate Communications

Sales Enablement

This is the most common usage of B2B mobile apps. Depending on the features and design, this type of mobile app allows the sales team to demo products and access sales presentations and product information across devices. If the mobile app is well-design and user-friendly, you can track usage analytics to better understand how and what content is being accessed. Triangulation with account coverage, sales feedback and CRM databases enables further quantification of the sales impact of your mobile app.

Employee Productivity

Paychex provides payroll and HR services for small and large enterprises. They strive to create world class payroll services for their customers, yet their own employees were calling the company’s call centers to get help understanding their paycheck status. To address this issue, Paychex created a user-friendly and easy to understand mobile app for entering virtual time cards and displaying detailed status of paychecks and other employee benefit related information. As a result, calls to the help center decreased to almost zero, reducing call center costs and improving customer satisfaction.

Classic Cocktails and 5 Ways for B2B to Use Mobile AppsClassic Cocktails and 5 Ways for B2B to Use Mobile Apps

Customer Retention

Sean discovered that

Mobile has become the preferred platform, even for work related activities. This led to the belief that the preferred method for tracking personal project status is also on a mobile device. By providing a mobile app, customers are now able to track the status of all project work at any time and anywhere as long as they have their mobile device. In addition, Sean added an escalation feature to this app. If customers are not happy or have further enquiries about a specific issue, they can hit a “call” button and reach him or the CEO directly 24/7.

With that ‘escalation’ feature, this mobile app is no longer a status-tracking app; it becomes an extension of the customer relationship function for the sales team and enables ITX to tout a ‘customer first’ message for marketing communications.

It’s interesting that one unique feature broadens the positioning of this mobile, but the purpose of this mobile app stays the same: to provide better customer experience and support!

Classic Cocktails and 5 Ways for BTB to Use Mobile AppsClassic Cocktails and five Ways for B2B to Use Mobile Apps5 Ways for B2B to Use Mobile Apps

Content Assessment

To make subscribers feel exclusive, some companies create mobile apps for their paid subscribers to access public and exclusive content. This is popular with publishing, media companies and content aggregation sites (Harvard Business Review, The WSJ, Interior Design and Fliboard etc.). This can also be used to access companies’ Sharepoint or collaboration sites.

Corporate Communications

More and more enterprises are creating different apps for different functions within the companies. The most common mobile app is to access companies’ intranet sites. Intel provides airplane shuttle service between the Hillsboro Airport in Oregon and the Santa Clara Airport in California for their employees who frequently travel between those sites. A mobile app was created to allow easy booking and status checking. There is even a mobile app for new employees to look up Intel’s many unique acronyms.

For marketing professionals, we often need to determine which form factor (a website or a mobile app) will be most appropriate for our users. Sean contends that the question is not about a website versus a mobile app. He stresses that you need to ask yourself three questions:

  • What purpose do you want to accomplish?
  • What experience do you want to provide to your users?
  • What will make it easy for your users?

Once you can answer these three questions, the answer of a website vs. a mobile app will naturally come to you. He also mentions that responsive or adaptive website design is a must.

Throughout the night, we tried different versions of the Old Pal with different whiskies and different bitter mixes. Who would have known that a classic cocktail could spark a blog post about mobile apps?! Sean, let’s get together again, when you are in Portland. I am looking forward to getting another cocktail recommendation from you. See you soon, old pal.

Bonus: Sean’s secret recipe. He calls the drink, the Older Pal. Give it a try!

2 parts Old Overholdt Rye

1 Part Amaro Nonino

1 Part Aperol

2 dashes of Fee Brother’s Orange Bitters

Classic Cocktails and 5 Ways for B2B to Use Mobile Apps

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How to break down your marketing to determine your tech budget

Technology Plays a Major Role in Developing and Executing Marketing Efforts

 

This post was originally published on TheGuardian.com on 2/13/15.

Evaluating the technological needs for a marketing campaign can be difficult, but breaking things down into the following categories can help. To understand how you should break down your marketing to determine your tech budget, we have to understand how our consumers interact.

Consumer purchase behaviors have changed dramatically in recent years. From the enablement of Wi-Fi to the prevalence of smartphone devices with user-friendly apps and social media channels, the ways in which we choose, evaluate and buy have changed significantly. In response, marketers must consider the role of technology as they develop and execute their marketing efforts.

Something old

No matter how technology evolves, the need to create a strategy and comprehend an audience’s challenges and aspirations are a must.

Technology is important when creating a marketing plan, but technology itself is only one piece of the puzzle. Clearly articulating the objectives you want your marketing to achieve will help determine and source the technology you need to bring a marketing plan to life. It may sound like an old record but it’s true: start your plan with a purpose and thoroughly understand your audience.

Something new

Once you understand your objectives and audience, the best way to evaluate your technological needs is to break down your marketing activity into several categories. Using a simple grid like the one below will help you decide on your campaign scope, marketing approach and budget.

Break down your marketing to determine your tech budget

Breaking down your efforts into “big v small” and “traditional v new” can help determine and source technologies at a strategic level. Once a high-level assessment is complete, it leads to the next level of discussions with IT, business units, stakeholders and vendors in order to determine the technology budget and plans to execute the marketing campaign.

Let’s look at each approach individually.

1. Traditional marketing with a big campaign scope

Common examples of this category are product launches for business-to-business (B2B) campaigns or holiday pushes for business-to-consumer (B2C) campaigns.

A launch or brand team is typically in charge of major campaigns and should have the budget to cover various marketing channels. The team will be responsible for business goals, campaign themes, new creative, product messaging and positioning. Once the integrated campaign plan is approved, technology requirements will be worked out through regular launch meetings and discussions.

Case studies: #LidlSurprises campaign and Target’s holiday plan

2. Traditional marketing with a small campaign scope

Traditional and small campaigns are usually recurring, have small budgets and make use of existing creative, processes and tools. Email campaigns are a great example.

They can promote a brand’s various offerings to encourage purchases or content downloads. Email or direct marketing runs on a timely basis with established technologies. Occasionally, the tech involved needs to be updated or new tools need to be integrated to connect with other marketing functions or enhance data analytics capabilities.

Case study: The content-rich Brain Pickings’ newsletter

3. New marketing with a big campaign scope

While the “traditional and big” example is marketing-driven, the “new and big” model is technology-driven.

One example is Tesco Homeplus’ virtual subway stores in South Korea. The company brought the store to commuters by creating a virtual store in subway train stations. Customers could use their smartphones to shop while waiting for trains.

The technologies required to execute this campaign are huge: the design of the virtual store; user-experience work on the mobile app; scanning, photo-taking and digital integration with Tesco’s inventory, ordering and fulfillment system. In addition, the Tesco team has to make sure the app worked for key mobile operating systems. This initiative started with the business objective of creating a virtual store. That objective led to big budget and resource allocations to tackle massive technical challenges and propel cross-department commitment and collaboration. Attempting a project like this requires marketers to explore, pilot and test technologies they are not familiar with. In this situation, technology takes the lead over marketing.

Case study: The Antarctica Beer Turnstile at Rio Carnival

4. New marketing with a small campaign scope

Like the “new and big” model, the “new and small” setup can also come from an idea, albeit one with a much smaller scope.

It may or may not be technology-driven. It can be as simple as a fun activity used to engage with your customers.

One great example was when Ikea in Singapore partnered with a local animal shelter to raise awareness about dog adoption.

After taking professional photos of these shelter dogs, cutout boards were placed in Ikea showrooms so that customers could visualize the dog in a warm and welcome environment. Interested customers could scan QR codes that would open the shelter’s website and display the dog’s name, bio and a short video. Creative, but not expensive, the idea helped drive awareness of animal rescue efforts and shelter dog adoption. It was such a great success that an Ikea store in Tempe, Arizona adopted the campaign to became the first US store to feature shelter pets.

Case studies: Yotel’s interactive Lego wall; Victoria FC’s blood donation campaign

One you break down your marketing efforts into these categories, you can easily drive the next-level technology discussion with relevant stakeholders and vendors.

 

Break down your marketing to determine your tech budget

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Drive Your Global Efforts: A Groupon Case Study

I attended the session presented by Andrew Mishalove, Groupon’s Global Social Business Strategist, at a marketing conference in Las Vegas. Andrew is not a content marketer, per se, but I found what he does for Groupon is totally related to “content” from the perspective of setting a process and building tools to allow employees around the world to come together, stay together and work together.

Groupon had completed more than 30 acquisitions and grown to over 10,000 employees worldwide in less than seven years. New employees were being added faster than the company could properly integrate and train them about Groupon culture. With such rapid expansions, it’s essential to have a tool or a process to allow management to share its vision and key initiatives, while enabling employees to collaborate and communicate across time zones and regions as they build a unified corporate culture. Andrew was tasked to come up with something!

Andrew used Jive to build an internal employee community platform. It’s a virtual place with various communication features that allow all the employees to congregate and share ideas and best practices and management to communicate vision, business goals and annual strategic directions.

Once the internal community was launched, he focused on promoting its benefits and educating employees on how they can use the community platform. He created several videos and wrote blogs to share with employees worldwide on how they can use the community to talk to each other. Slowly, he noticed that sales and marketing teams were uploading training and other content in the community and sharing with their counterparts in other regions and countries. Useful content for both internal and external communications were uploaded and shared.  Andrew called this “Phase I” roll out:

He noticed that most employees will log in, look and search for content while 15-20% of employees are active contributors.

Andrew recently launched Phase 2 by targeting engineers to be active in this internal community. Engineers are the backbone of new product development.

Andrew kicked off the Engineering Hackthon in the internal community and asked engineers to come up with cool features of products and showcase them to the organizations. More than 50 ideas were presented and hundreds of votes were casted.

Engineers tend to be reclusive and reluctant to use new tools. Through Hackthon, Andrew was able to drive a record volume of traffic and adaption of the tool to the engineering groups.

After the session, I asked Andrew about the country usage of the internal community for collaboration and communications. Each country can create their own community using their local languages in this platform. Groupon has a presence in most key Asia Pacific and European counties.

He mentioned that country team’s active engagements have a lot to do with the local community managers. If the local community managers (who are volunteers) are passionate and strong believers in the community and its benefits, they will go out of their ways to encourage local teams to use it.

So far, UK and Spain are very active. Germany is coming alone. Malaysia and Australia are engaging. Japan is a bit challenging.

With more than 30 acquisitions, new employees continue to be added Groupon, so training and integrating them into the Groupon family remains a challenge. In response, new features continue to be added to the community to ensure better and easier collaboration.

In my book, I dedicated chapter three to discussing the importance of organizing a team for global content marketing.

Andrew’s effort highlights the importance of having tools and processes available to enhance communications and collaborations between the headquarters and local teams to drive global efforts. He also keenly pointed out that this initiative needs to be led and coordinated by the headquarters.

Granted, continuous internal promotions and education about available tools is essential. But it’s even more important to understand what will incentivize your employees to use those tools. Using Hackthon with engineers is a great example.

Drive Your Global Efforts - A Groupon Case Study

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See How BuzzSumo Uses Their Product as Their Marketing Platform

Depending on our job descriptions, our goals and our budgets, we all use a mixture of tools to create, promote or measure content. One tool that I’ve started using is BuzzSumo. I use it to discover content that’s been heavily shared, find influencers for niche topics, receive targeted content alerts based on keywords and to check on specific sites’ content performance. (Note: I have paid for my BuzzSumo-pro subscription and have no affiliation with the company.)

After using their tool, I have four interesting observations that I can apply to content marketing:

Make it Easy for Users

James Blackwell, Co-Founder of BuzzSumo, mentioned “make it easy for user” several times during our phone conversation. Initially, I was wondering what “it” is. At the end of our conversation, it became clear that “it” means user-interface design and customer experience. What can you do from a design perspective to make your product intuitive? If you can’t make it intuitive, is it possible to add something to assist users figure out?

When you log into BuzzSumo you see a clean design, which shows key product features on the top: Content Search, Influencer Search, Content Alerts and Reports.

On the center of the page is a quick explanation of “Content Search”. If you don’t know where to start, no problem, let’s start with “show me how it works in 60 seconds.”

When you click on “Show me how it works”, you get a quick, 7-step tour on “what’s what” on the page.

see how buzzsumo uses their product as their marketing platform see how buzzsumo uses their product as their marketing platform

It’s interesting to note that they have not created any show-and-tell videos to educate their users. They took a slightly different approach and used a click-by-user tour guide as an alternative show-and-tell. Although they don’t use videos, they schedule regular webinars to educate their users on advanced and new features.

Fun and human-like copy

In addition, appropriately used words evoke emotions. Witty copy is sprinkled within BuzzSumo like little charms. Here are some great examples of copy used while waiting for reports to be loaded:

see how buzzsumo uses their product as their marketing platform

see how buzzsumo uses their product as their marketing platform

see how buzzsumo uses their product as their marketing platform

James calls them micro-copy. Injecting the copy as if the tool is talking to you adds a nice touch to the tool.

Old-fashioned word-of-mouth is the best marketing

BuzzSumo built their first product in six months and launched it in November 2012. Aimed at marketing agencies, they initially offered their products for free and did extensive manual outreach (Don’t we all do that?) to their professional networks. They asked marketing agencies, bloggers and any marketing professionals they knew to try it. James chuckled and said:

It just that we do “virtual” word-of-mouth and referrals via our on-line and social media channels.   The tactics have changed, but the essence of marketing stays the same.

Marketing communications are seamlessly embedded in the products

BuzzSumo encourage users to try a free version of their product. They discovered that conversions to paid versions tended to happen inside the product, not on their website. Therefore they embedded several communications features in the product itself. Product-oriented content, such as how to better use their products, is displayed while using the application. This is nothing new. However, they use the message board to quickly communicate new features and updates to their existing users.

BuzzSumo doesn’t need to do email campaigns and customers don’t need to wait for software updates.

Which BuzzSumo does in order to deliver the latest updates, blog posts, tips and tricks. More communication is possible via a chat feature, which also yields feedback that is a form of marketing research. In addition, BuzzSumo also hosts webinars that can be directly accessed from within the product. That’s pretty neat.

Essentially, their product is their marketing platform.

see how buzzsumo uses their product as their marketing platform

Of BuzzSumo’s current 50,000 users, about 300 have subscribed to the paid version since it recently launched in September of 2014. With a company of only 4 people, they are hoping to leverage the in-product marketing to grow the user base.

Not every company has a SaaS platform or software product into which marketing features can be incorporated. While this example may not apply to some industries or companies, the essence of “making it easy for your customers” and “making your product your marketing” should still be a guiding principle.

see how buzzsumo uses their product as their marketing platform

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China’s Social Media Landscape

What is China’s Social Media Landscape?

 

I recently gave a talk on China’s social media landscape at the Content Marketing World. In 2010, China surpassed Japan and became the 2nd largest economy in the world. Yet, this country is somehow misunderstood or misrepresented by the western media.

In this deck, I provided fun stats about the Chinese social media landscape. To put things in perspective: China has ONE time zone, while the US has nine. The US has approx. 10 cities with a population > 1M people, while China has >190 cities with a population > 1M people. Although Google, Facebook, YouTube, WordPress and other social media platforms are banned on China’s social media network, their homegrown social media tools are arguably better than ours. They are not really missing out on the social media party.

In some ways, Chinese are no different than us. We all love our mobile devices and spend hours on the following online activities.

China's Social Media Landscape

We are also very similar in pursuing happiness, health, career advancement, financial stability and the well-being of our families. Yet, there are cultural differences, language barriers, religious beliefs, laws and regulations, which drive us apart. When we explore content to scale, it’s important to focus on the commonalities from the get go to drive some degrees of consensus before we focus on our differences and uniqueness.

Check out my presentation with fun visuals.

Bonus: I also discovered the following resources beneficial to further understand the Chinese social media landscape:

Blog: Resonance.com provides great insight on China Social Media:

http://www.resonancechina.com/china-social-media-blog/

YouTube Channel: China How It Is by Serpentza

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCD2898DBC1440B4C

Video: The Chinese Social Media Landscape:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MksK8spSrMQ

Video: The Social Media Landscape in China:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X92RKBE-KVY

Video: The economist: China and the Internet:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_cywVDheJj8

china's social media landscape

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My Interview with Mark Masters on Content Marketing

This interview was originally published on The ID Group on July, 14th,2014

The ID Group is a content marketing and design agency in the UK. Mark Masters, managing director of The ID Group, interviewed me for his “Talking Content” Column. Six questions, six answers. I’ve added some additional detail to my answers here. Check it out.

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